Search Results

You are looking at 1-10 of 170

Influence of Fasting Duration on Body Fluid and Hemodynamics
Masanori Tsukamoto DDS, PhD,
 Takashi Hitosugi DDS, PhD, and
 Takeshi Yokoyama DDS, PhD
Article Category: Research Article
Volume/Issue: Volume 64: Issue 4
Online Publication Date: Jan 01, 2017
DOI: 10.2344/anpr-65-01-01
Page Range: 226 – 229

resistance. 4 – 8 A prolonged fasting duration prior to surgery might lead to unstable hemodynamics, and might have a potentially harmful influence on cardiac preload. 9 However, there are few reports about the perioperative relationships of body fluid parameters and cardiovascular parameters. Perioperative fluid management is an important consideration during surgery. Assessment tools, such as bioelectrical impedance analysis, are currently available for determining body fluid parameters. 10 – 12 Bioelectrical impedance analysis is a simple and noninvasive

Download PDF
Hitoshi Higuchi DDS, PhD,
 Akiko Yabuki DDS,
 Minako Ishii-Maruhama DDS, PhD,
 Yumiko Tomoyasu DDS, PhD,
 Shigeru Maeda DDS, PhD, and
 Takuya Miyawaki DDS, PhD
Article Category: Other
Volume/Issue: Volume 61: Issue 4
Online Publication Date: Jan 01, 2014
Page Range: 150 – 154

for dental treatment of patients receiving antipsychotic therapy. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to clarify the changes in hemodynamics caused by a drug interaction between adrenaline and an antipsychotic and to evaluate the safety of the combined use of adrenaline with an antipsychotic in an animal study. MATERIALS AND METHODS Animals The protocol of the present study was approved by Okayama University Animal Care and Use Committee (approval number: OKU-2012569). We used male Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing

Yoshiki Shionoya DDS, PhD,
 Eishi Nakamura DDS,
 Gentaro Tsujimoto DDS, PhD,
 Takayuki Koyata DDS,
 Asako Yasuda DDS, PhD,
 Kiminari Nakamura DDS, PhD, and
 Katsuhisa Sunada DDS, PhD
Article Category: Research Article
Volume/Issue: Volume 68: Issue 3
Online Publication Date: Oct 04, 2021
Page Range: 141 – 145

hospitals with both dentistry and psychiatry departments. The survey suggested that hypotension arising from the concomitant use of antipsychotics and epinephrine-containing lidocaine may be rare. 6 However, no prospective study has assessed the effects of the interaction between epinephrine-containing lidocaine used for dentistry and antipsychotics on hemodynamic parameters. In addition, general anesthesia is often necessary when providing dental care for patients regularly taking antipsychotic drugs, as they may exhibit uncooperative behavior and/or poor compliance

Figure 2.  ; Transthoracic echocardiogram results. Normal left ventricular size and function, mild hypokinesis in basal segments. Ejection fraction 55–60%, normal right ventricular size and function, no hemodynamically significant valvular abnormalities.
Regina A. E. Dowdy,
 Shadee. T. Mansour,
 James H. Cottle,
 Hannah R. Mabe,
 Harry B. Weprin,
 Leigh E. Yarborough,
 Gregory M. Ness,
 Todd M. Jacobs, and
 Bryant W. Cornelius
<bold>Figure 2. </bold>
Figure 2. 

Transthoracic echocardiogram results. Normal left ventricular size and function, mild hypokinesis in basal segments. Ejection fraction 55–60%, normal right ventricular size and function, no hemodynamically significant valvular abnormalities.


Satoru Sakurai,
 Atsuo Fukunaga,
 Tatsuya Ichinohe, and
 Yuzuru Kaneko
<bold>Figure 2. </bold>
Figure 2. 

Change in hemodynamic variables. Data are presented as mean ± SD, n = 10. *P < .05 versus baseline control. SBP indicates systolic blood pressure; DBP, diastolic blood pressure; and HR, heart rate.


Masanori Tsukamoto,
 Takashi Hitosugi, and
 Takeshi Yokoyama

Body fluid change in the 2 groups. ◊ indicates am group; □, pm group; TBW, total body water, ICW, intercellular water; ECW, extracellular water. There was no significant difference in patients' characteristics. Values are means ± SD or number of patients.


Ryo Wakita,
 Hikaru Kohase, and
 Haruhisa Fukayama
Figure 2.
Figure 2.

Effect of dexmedetomidine and midazolam on systemic hemodynamics. Values are measured at the start of sedation (start), lowest during sedation (during), and end of sedation (end). Values represent median (interquartile range [range]). * P < .05. BPs indicates systolic blood pressure; BPd, diastolic blood pressure; HR, heart rate; and SpO2, oxygen saturation.


Ryo Wakita,
 Hikaru Kohase, and
 Haruhisa Fukayama
Figure 3.
Figure 3.

Effect of dexmedetomidine and midazolam on systemic hemodynamics. Values are measured at the start of sedation (start), lowest during sedation (during), and end of sedation (end). Values represent median (interquartile range [range]). † P < .05 vs start. BPs indicates systolic blood pressure; BPd, diastolic blood pressure; HR, heart rate; and SpO2, oxygen saturation.


Figure 1.
Figure 1.

Box plots of hemodynamic variables during the first 12 postoperative hours, for group H & M.

HR: Heart rate, SBP: Systolic blood pressure, DBP: Diastolic blood pressure.

P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant (repeated measures ANOVA, Student-Newman-Keuls test).


Hitoshi Higuchi,
 Akiko Yabuki,
 Minako Ishii-Maruhama,
 Yumiko Tomoyasu,
 Shigeru Maeda, and
 Takuya Miyawaki
Figure 2.
Figure 2.

The blockade effect of propranolol (Pro) on hemodynamic changes by drug interaction between adrenaline (AD) and chlorpromazine (Ch) on mean blood pressure (MBP) (a) and pulse rate (PR) (b) (Ch + saline: n = 4; Ch + Pro + AD: n = 3). AD induced modest hypertension, but did not significantly influence pulse rate change in Pro + Ch–pretreated rats. P values are for between-agent comparisons (vs the value for Ch + saline) at specified time intervals by using 2-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni's post hoc test. Data represent means ± SD.